Was folklore studies Finlandized? Changing scholarly trends in Finnish folklore studies in the Cold War

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of the Cold War on Finnish folklore studies as an academic discipline. Drawing on the university curricula of folklore studies at the University of Helsinki, the article seeks to trace disciplinary shifts from 1943 to 1979. The era coincided with a period of Finlandization—that is, a political culture subservient to the Soviet Union. The research strategies that the leading folklorists took continued concentrating on ethno-historically important Finnish- or Swedish-speaking oral traditions. International orientation consisted of balancing between the East and West scholarship. Among the academics, Finlandization often meant simply ignoring topics that dealt with the USSR.
Original languageEnglish
Article number4
Pages (from-to)58–78
Number of pages20
JournalCultural Analysis
Volume19
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2021
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • History of ethnological sciences; Finnish folklore studies; Theoretical trends in folklore studies; The Cold War, Finlandization
  • Folklore history
  • Ethnology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Was folklore studies Finlandized? Changing scholarly trends in Finnish folklore studies in the Cold War'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this