Victimization from intimate partner rape in Uganda: Sex differences, psychological concomitants, and the effect of educational leve

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Abstract

Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate victimization from intimate partner rape (IPR) in Uganda among both women and men, the effect of educational level, and psychological concomitants. Method: A questionnaire was completed by 609 females and 420 males in Uganda. The mean age was 31.5 (SD 10.9) for females and 34.4 (SD 11.3) for males. Results: Females reported significantly higher frequencies of victimization from IPR than males. Respondents with no education reported significantly higher frequencies of victimization than others. Respondents who had been more than average victimized from IPR scored significantly higher on depression and anxiety and had significantly lower self-esteem than others. Females who had been victimized more than average scored significantly lower on self-esteem than the other groups. Conclusions: Not only females but also males were found to have been victimized from IPR. Victimization was linked to increased levels of negative psychological concomitants in both females and males. Keywords: Victimization from intimate partner rape, sex differences, psychological concomitants, educational level, Uganda
Original languageUndefined/Unknown
Pages (from-to)603–610
JournalMedical Science and Discovery
Volume7
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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