Subfossil Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) Wood from Northern Finland—Physical, Mechanical, and Chemical Properties and Suitability for Specialty Products

Veikko Möttönen, Samuli Helama, Andrey Pranovich, Ekaterina Korotkova, Chunlin Xu, Hannu Herva, Henrik Heräjärvi, Harri Mäkinen, Pekka Nöjd, Tuula Jyske

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
23 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The physical, mechanical, and chemical properties of both stem wood and knot wood were investigated from two subfossil Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trunks retrieved from a lake in Finnish Lapland, dated to 404–486 CE and to 1318–1444 CE. Both the stem wood and the knot wood of the younger trunk had higher moisture content, lower density, and lower strength properties in comparison to the older trunk. The ash content of the stem wood of the younger trunk was lower, but the ash content of the knot wood was higher than that of the older trunk. Due to the degradation that occurred over time, all the values of physical and mechanical properties were lower compared to typical values of recently grown Scots pine wood. The chemical composition of both stem wood samples was close to the composition of the recently grown wood, and the only exception was the small decrease of the cellulose and hemicellulose in the subfossil samples. The bulk extractives were well-preserved, but terpenes and fatty acids underwent transformation, resulting in more stable compounds. The SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) showed pros and cons for the productization of subfossil wood, with the branding value of an ancient material being the potential enabler in developing commercial niche uses.

Original languageEnglish
Article number704
JournalForests
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2022
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Subfossil Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) Wood from Northern Finland—Physical, Mechanical, and Chemical Properties and Suitability for Specialty Products'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this