Cautious or marginalized? Perceptions of the riskiness of engaging in corruption and gender differences in corruptness

Fredrik Malmberg, Inga Saikkonen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
15 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Previous studies suggest that women are often perceived as less corrupt and more risk averse, possibly due to longstanding asymmetries in power and marginalization that reproduce certain gender stereotypes. However, much remains unclear regarding the origins of these perceptions. Why are some individuals and societies more prone to perceive women as less corrupt than men? We present the first cross-country examination of these questions utilizing data from the latest wave of the World Values Survey, covering a total of 49 countries. Our results suggest that both perceived riskiness of corruption and attitude toward gender equality, in addition to the overall level of gender inequality in society, matter in explaining a stronger belief in gender differences in corruptness. However, the positive association between a higher perceived riskiness and the perception that women are less corrupt is mostly limited to societies with high levels of corruption and gender inequality.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-117
JournalPolitics & Policy
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2024
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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