Analyses of long-term fungal degradation of spruce bark reveals varying potential for catabolism of polysaccharides and extractive compounds

Amanda S. Ristinmaa, Ekaterina Korotkova, Magnus Ø. Arntzen, Vincent G. H. Eijsink, Chunlin Xu, Anna Sundberg, Merima Hasani, Johan Larsbrink

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Abstract

The bark represents the outer protective layer of trees. It contains high concentrations of antimicrobial extractives, in addition to regular wood polymers. It represents a huge underutilized side stream in forestry, but biotechnological valorization is hampered by a lack of knowledge on microbial bark degradation. Many fungi are efficient lignocellulose degraders, and here, spruce bark degradation by five species, Dichomitus squalens, Rhodonia placenta, Penicillium crustosum, Trichoderma sp. B1, and Trichoderma reesei, was mapped, by continuously analyzing chemical changes in the bark over six months. The study reveals how fungi from different phyla degrade bark using diverse strategies, regarding both wood polymers and extractives, where toxic resin acids were degraded by Basidiomycetes but unmodified/tolerated by Ascomycetes. Proteome analyses of the white-rot D. squalens revealed several proteins, with both known and unknown functions, that were specifically upregulated during growth on bark. This knowledge can accelerate improved utilization of an abundant renewable resource.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBioresource Technology
Volume402
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2024
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • White-rot fungi
  • Resin acids
  • Proteomics
  • CAZyme

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