Phytoplankton, physical and chemical microscale variations
in three brackish rock pools

A1 Journal article (refereed)


Internal Authors/Editors


Publication Details

List of Authors: Kerstin Häggqvist, Tore Lindholm
Publisher: Blackwell Science
Publication year: 2016
Journal: Phycological Research
Volume number: 64
Issue number: 4
Start page: 241
End page: 250
eISSN: 1440-1835


Abstract

Variations at the microscale in phytoplankton distribution with
respect to physical and chemical variables in three brackish
rock pools of different depth, size and exposure were studied
during the growth season. Three hypotheses were made about
the microspatial characteristics of the rock pool habitat:
(i) there are distinct microscale variations in physical and
chemical variables, (ii) the microscale distribution of phytoplankton
is related to characteristic physical and/or chemical
variables, and (iii) microscale variations are more pronounced
in deep rock pools. Variations were studied at a 10 cm scale
by close interval siphon sampling. Physical and chemical variations
were small irrespective of rock pool. Prevailing
weather, as well as the similar round basin shape of the pools
contributed to the similarities. Variations in phytoplankton
microscale distributions were clear and consistent throughout
the study period, and less variable in the deepest pool compared
to the shallower ones. The distribution of dominant phytoplankton
species correlated with microscale variations in
temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH, often during seasonal
minima or maxima. The microscale correlations implied that
short reaction times of phytoplankton enabled them to exploit,
or be influenced by, brief, local variations. The results demonstrated
the importance of studies at fine scales to disentangle
processes even in shallow weather-influenced ecosystems.
Variations at the microscale in phytoplankton distribution with
respect to physical and chemical variables in three brackish
rock pools of different depth, size and exposure were studied
during the growth season. Three hypotheses were made about
the microspatial characteristics of the rock pool habitat:
(i) there are distinct microscale variations in physical and
chemical variables, (ii) the microscale distribution of phytoplankton
is related to characteristic physical and/or chemical
variables, and (iii) microscale variations are more pronounced
in deep rock pools. Variations were studied at a 10 cm scale
by close interval siphon sampling. Physical and chemical variations
were small irrespective of rock pool. Prevailing
weather, as well as the similar round basin shape of the pools
contributed to the similarities. Variations in phytoplankton
microscale distributions were clear and consistent throughout
the study period, and less variable in the deepest pool compared
to the shallower ones. The distribution of dominant phytoplankton
species correlated with microscale variations in
temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH, often during seasonal
minima or maxima. The microscale correlations implied that
short reaction times of phytoplankton enabled them to exploit,
or be influenced by, brief, local variations. The results demonstrated
the importance of studies at fine scales to disentangle
processes even in shallow weather-influenced ecosystems.

Last updated on 2019-13-11 at 04:15